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I think you’d agree that paying $5 for a cup of lemonade is a bit too much right? True in most cases but not when the cup was being sold by kid entrepreneurs.

So the other day I was driving my daughter and her friends to the movie theater as part of her birthday celebration.

Being mid summer, the day was super hot day.

Like 85 degrees.

So passing 3 kids on a corner selling lemonade was the last thing I expected to see given the suffocating heat.

I drove my crew to the movies and on my way back I stopped by the lemonade stand.

I had to check these 3 kid entrepreneurs out. 

It's morally irresponsible for any parent to pass a kid's lemonade stand without buying.

I started chatting with the kids and they introduced themselves as the “Brown Family”. (not their real name)

They told me they have been selling lemonade for the past 3 summers.

The oldest of the 3, a 10 year old boy with a wild mohalk hair cut said he has all his money saved but the two younger ones said they spend their money as soon as they made it.

Kid Entrepreneurs

I asked them if it wasn’t too hot out to be standing on the street corner selling lemonade and the answer I got from the older boy impressed me.

“Not when I’m making the benjamiiins”, he said (drawing out ‘miiins’ as he proudly showed loot)

I reminded him that we are Canadians and we don’t use ‘Benjamins’ and he said no Sir. Every bill or coin is a Benjamiiin, it doesn’t matter where you are.

Damn son! Who your mother & papa is?

Impressed

We went on to chat about how they got started and what he wanted to do when he grew up.

The madman pusher in me then came out and I decided to test the youth and his siblings.

A cup of lemonade was 50 cents so I told him that I would pay $5 for the cup.

I handed him a $5 bill.

I then told him that I have 3 more trips to make in the next 4 hours and as long as he is here, I would be stopping by to buy a cup for 5 bucks.

I wanted to test his resolve.

He said yes Sir.

Kid Entrepreneurs

3 Hours Later

I had downed 3 more tiny styrofoam cups of lemonade in exchange for a grand total of $20.

To say I was impressed would be an understatement.

As soon as I paid for my last cup, the kids packed up their wares and called it a day.

It means that they had been waiting for me!

I asked them to lead me to their house. I wanted to have a chat with their parents. They led me to their house which just around the corner.

When we got to their house, the mother came out and I told her the whole story.

I suggested that she buys Andy Frisella’s Children Books for the kids and she said she won’t because the kids have their own money.

She said she will get them to use their own money to buy the books.

I almost teared up. 😂

Kid Entrepreneurs

This is the kind of stuff that gets to me at a profound level.

I then asked the mother if it was ok for me to check on the lemonade stand throughout the summer. She said it was ok.

So I decided that if by the end of summer, the books hadn’t been bought, I will buy them myself.

I’d buy the books and just drop them by the door and never tell anybody.

Why?

Because that’s just the way I roll.

How do you roll?

Smart Parents

My conversation with the mother of the kid entrepreneurs revealed that these parents practice and teach all the things that smart parents teach that stupid parents don’t.

I was pleasantly surprised to learn that both the mom and dad value building a strong work ethic in their kids as well as a very strong drive to win.

A fairly large family by North American standards, all the 5 kids have chores and tasks that are assigned according to age.

They’re all expected to complete their tasks at the time the task is supposed to be completed.

When I asked her how she ensures that all the kids comply she gave me the ‘are you kidding me look’ and then said in a matter of fact way: “If you wanna eat, you do your chores”

I pray there are more parents like this mother.

Your Turn

Do you feel obligated to buy lemonade when you see a kid entrepreneur standing in the middle of the summer sun?


 

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